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Google Chrome will block annoying ads

News, 05 June 2017
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SAN FRANCISCO: Google has confirmed that updates to its Chrome browser early next year will block the most annoying ads that currently plague consumers.

As a member of the Coalition for Better Ads, Google announced in a blog post that it will expect ads to comply with the industry group's Better Ads Standards and it urged advertisers and publishers to refer to Google's new best practice guide.

"It's far too common that people encounter annoying, intrusive ads on the web – like the kind that blare music unexpectedly, or force you to wait 10 seconds before you can see the content on the page," explained Sridhar Ramaswamy, Google's SVP of Ads & Commerce.

"These frustrating experiences can lead some people to block all ads – taking a big toll on the content creators, journalists, web developers and videographers who depend on ads to fund their content creation," his blog post continued.

Ramaswamy added that Google is launching a new Ad Experience Report, which aims to help publishers understand how the Better Ads Standards apply to their own websites, and the report also provides a list of ads that publishers can use instead.

"The vast majority of online content creators fund their work with advertising. That means they want the ads that run on their sites to be compelling, useful and engaging – ones that people actually want to see and interact with," he said.

Along with its guidance on ad standards, Google also unveiled plans to help publishers deal with the worldwide rise of ad blocking software that hits their income.

The company's Funding Choices tool, currently in beta, will enable publishers to send messages to users of ad blockers, inviting them either to enable ads or otherwise pay a charge via a new version Google's Contributor service.

Summing up, Ramaswamy said: "We believe these changes will ensure all content creators, big and small, can continue to have a sustainable way to fund their work with online advertising."

Data sourced from Google; additional content by WARC Staff

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