Presence and effects of health and nutrition-related (HNR) claims with benefit-seeking and risk-avoidance appeals in female-orientated magazine food advertisements

Hojoon Choi

University of Houston

Kyunga Yoo

University of Georgia

Tae Hyun Baek

Indiana University-Southeast

Leonard N. Reid

University of Georgia

Wendy Macias

Texas Christian University

Introduction

Food advertising is a subject of considerable research importance in the fields of advertising, health communication, marketing and nutrition (e.g. Andrews et al. 2000; Parker 2003; Young 2003; Dutta-Bergman 2004a, 2004b; Wansink & Chandon 2006; Ambler 2007; Chandon & Wansink 2007; Roberts & Pettigrew 2007; Brennan et al. 2008; Kim et al. 2009; Wicks et al. 2009; Culp et al. 2010; Hota et al. 2010; Yoon et al. 2010; Amos & Grau 2011; Knoll et al. 2011; Nicklas et al. 2011; Choi et al. 2012; Ho et al. 2012). Yet, many questions about the content and effects of food advertising remain unanswered, including the focus of this study – the presence of different types of health- and nutrition-related (HNR) claims with benefit-seeking and risk-avoidance appeals in food advertisements appearing in women-orientated magazines, and the effects of the two HNR-paired appeals on female consumers’ perceptual judgements of advertised food products.