Does Flow Influence the Brand Image in Event Marketing?

Jan Drengner
Chemnitz University of Technology

Hansjoerg Gaus
Chemnitz University of Technology

Steffen Jahn
Chemnitz University of Technology


INTRODUCTION

During the last few years, the term event marketing has been used extensively to describe different phenomena, like events as products, sales promotions, or sponsorships (Wohlfeil and Whelan, 2005). In contrast, in this article, the term event marketing is understood exclusively in the sense of a communication tool whose purpose is to disseminate a company's marketing messages by involving the target groups in experiential activities. This means that their members are themselves active during a so-called marketing event, e.g., by doing sports or being creative, thus offering the opportunity for social interaction among the participants as well as between participants and the company (Close, Finney, Lacey, and Sneath, 2006). These marketing events are organized by the companies themselves and can focus on different "event objects," such as brands, product lines, or the company itself. An example for a marketing event is the worldwide series of "Red Bull Flugtag" organized by the energy drink company Red Bull during which the participants jump from a ramp in a do-it-yourself flying machine into a lake and can win prizes in different categories (e.g., longest jump, most original flying machine). In this way, the brand is trying to express the advertising message "Red Bull vitalizes the body and mind."