The Warc Blog

How John Keats invented VR

Posted by: Malcolm White, Co-founder, Krow Communications

Blog author

OK, that's not strictly true. Actually, it's not true at all. But it made you want to read on, didn't it? Or perhaps not?

According to surveys, if you're a regular reader of poetry then you're in a tiny minority, so perhaps name-checking the writer of such masterpieces as 'Ode on a Grecian Urn', 'To Autumn' and 'Ode to a Nightingale' wasn't much of a hook for you?

23 September 2016, 11:24
Looking back at Ernest Dichter

Posted by: Malcolm White, Co-founder, Krow Communications

Blog author

If I were to suggest that almost every conversation you have about brands is influenced by the thinking of a Viennese psychologist, you'd probably think I was talking about Sigmund Freud. You'd be almost right, but not quite. Actually, I'm referring to the man who was sometimes known as the 'Sigmund Freud of the supermarket age' - a certain Ernest Dichter.

Ernest Dichter was one of the many extraordinary individuals who escaped Nazi Germany and went on to change postwar culture. Arriving in America in 1938, Dichter became part of what was known as the Motivation Research movement, which flourished in the 1940s and 1950s. The research techniques Dichter pioneered, and we are so familiar with today - including focus groups and depths - were developed to understand why people were attracted to certain products and lifestyle choices.

07 July 2016, 15:36
Back to the Future: The problem of premature evaluation

Posted by: Malcolm White, Co-founder, Krow Communications

Blog author

I've just come out of a dispiriting advertising research briefing and I wish I could time-travel back to 1974. The briefing was dispiriting because we're in danger of testing an early-stage, pre-production, TV advertising execution with qualitative research when we should be using the research to understand how the execution works in the hearts and minds of our target audience, and to provide objective feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of that execution. This research should be an aid to decision making, not act as judge and jury, handing down a 'Go/No Go' verdict. It's this idea of 'testing' that is so dangerous. And I've said all this.

While my colleagues and clients were all vigorously nodding their assent to the points I was making, I could tell (it's something in their eyes) that it was one of those 'yes, but' moments. Really, they're hoping that this research project will make the difficult decision about whether to proceed with this execution for them, and not with them.

17 May 2016, 10:45
Back to the future: Rosser Reeves' legacy

Posted by: Malcolm White, Co-founder, Krow Communications

Blog author

Malcolm White looks back ... at Rosser Reeves' legacy, not just his fallacy.

Rosser Reeves is infamous for proposing, more than half a century ago, that a good way of proving the effect of advertising was to compare the brand scores of ad recognisers with the brand scores of non-recognisers. He claimed that a correlation between high recognition and strong brand scores should be regarded as causal - when of course it shouldn't: people who already know and like a brand will tend to notice the same brand's advertising. This flawed logic is what became known as the Rosser Reeves Fallacy and it has cast a shadow over Reeves' reputation.

12 April 2016, 15:35
 

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