Get a demo Do I subscribe? News sign-up
Print

Tumblr will run ads on all blogs

News, 29 July 2016

NEW YORK: Advertisers will now be able to include Tumblr's network of bloggers in their campaigns after the popular social media platform announced that it will allow its bloggers to take some of the proceeds from the revenues generated.

Appropriately enough, the Yahoo-owned company made the announcement in a blog post and said that ads will be introduced this week, although bloggers won't get paid until some unspecified time later this year.

Bloggers who wish to participate in the scheme will need to register, but they can choose to opt out by changing their blog settings.

The development was first reported by TechCrunch, a subsidiary of AOL which just four days ago was reported to be merging with Yahoo in a $4.8bn takeover by Verizon, the US telecoms company.

Under the terms of the deal, Verizon will take on Tumblr as well as a host of other Yahoo companies, such as Flickr, the image-hosting site, and Yahoo's news and mail services.

According to TechCrunch, the fact that Tumblr users will have to opt out of hosting ads means that ads on blogs will be set to default, effectively allowing Tumblr to monetise its network of more than 306m blogs from 65m users.

TechCrunch also said the initiative appears to be an expansion of its earlier Creatrs program, which connects brands with Tumblr users directly instead of using a system whereby advertisers work with third-party influencer networks.

It is reported that ads will appear in three places – the main page of the Tumblr blog if the blogger is using the default Optica theme for their blog, as well as on the slide-out section on the web, and on Tumblr's mobile apps and mobile web.

"We continue to deliver ad solutions to grow Tumblr's business and maximise value for our advertisers and community," Tumblr said in a statement.

"Featuring Yahoo display and Gemini native ads across the Tumblr blog network is another example of these ongoing efforts."

Data sourced from Tumblr, TechCrunch; additional content by Warc staff