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Millennials act on app push notification

News, 27 October 2015

NEW YORK: Most millennials are using location-based services and a significant proportion are also acting on push notifications received via those apps that know where they are.

According to a recent survey of 500 millennials for Retale, a weekly ads and deals app, 94% used smartphone apps capable of identifying their geographical location. And 84% acted on push-notifications from these platforms.

"Millennials are highly engaged with well-executed push-notifications from brands and retailers," said Pat Dermody, President of Retale.

She explained to Luxury Daily, that "well-executed" meant two things. "First, that the notifications are hyper-relevant, using contextual data like location and behaviour. And, secondly, that they provide actual value, in the form of coupons, circulars and discounts."

Coupons and customer rewards were the main sorts of material millennials wanted pushed to them, being cited by 61% of respondents.

Rather fewer were interested in new product information or the location of nearby stores and their opening hours (35% for each), while there was limited enthusiasm for getting receipts after a purchase (27%) and in-store guidance on product location (16%).

Dermody suggested that merchandise information could be "a huge growth area for brands and retailers" which were already displaying expertise around coupon-based notifications.

"Millennial shoppers are … open to more," she said. "They want to know about new, relevant products."

What they don't want to see are notifications that aren't relevant enough (39%) or which they perceive to be intrusive (34%). Volume was also a turn-off for 25%.

Those brands that have already established themselves in consumers' affections are ahead of the game. Some 89% of respondents said they were more likely to engage with push-notifications received from favourite brands, rising to 91% among men (85% among women).

Data sourced from Luxury Daily, MediaPost; additional content by Warc staff