Get a demo Do I subscribe? News sign-up
Print

Marketers struggle with personalisation

News, 03 March 2016

LONDON: A majority of marketers think that personalisation can boost customer engagement and improve brand perception but rather fewer have risen to the challenge, new research suggests.

For its latest Market Insight Report,The Pressures of Personalisation, The Drum surveyed 200 brand marketers to better understand how they are addressing this area and the extent of their ability to provide personalised experiences across a growing number of touchpoints.

It found that 80% of respondents felt personalisation had a significant positive impact on brand perception and customer engagement and that 69% thought it very important to the customer experience.

Accordingly, 63% indicated they had made changes to their customer insights & analytics strategy over the past year in order to drive greater personalisation, including hiring external resources and enhancing existing implementation.

Budget and technology however, remained important constraints for half the marketers surveyed.

And only 40% were unifying data across channels to better enable personalisation while many remained focused on more traditional digital channels such as email and website, even as consumers are gravitating towards newer ones like apps.

But the report said that, on the whole, many marketers were "on the right path towards personalisation" even if many were still at the early stages.

It added that personalisation is fast becoming essential as consumers increasingly expect brands to contact them only at relevant times.

This is exemplified in the trend towards "moment marketing" as brands identify brief opportunities to put the right message in front of the right consumer, using a combination of big data, programmatic buying and location-based targeting.

Warc's Toolkit 2016 noted that some companies have even taken the step of restructuring their marketing teams around moments rather than around specific brands in order to better exploit these prospects.

Data sourced from The Drum; additional content by Warc staff