Get a demo Do I subscribe? News sign-up
Print

Jeep ventures into real estate

News, 19 May 2016
Topics

SYDNEY: Jeep's new Grand Land campaign has seen a surge in dealership traffic and test drives of the Grand Cherokee model, as the automaker not only promotes a spirit of adventure but offers consumers the chance to own a piece of Australia.

People booking a test drive for the Jeep Grand Cherokee through the grandland.jeep.com.au site can enter a prize draw to win their very own a plot of land where they can live the lifestyle being promoted by the brand. (For more, including details on the campaign's strategy and execution, read Warc's exclusive report: How Jeep is helping Australians' spirit of adventure become a reality.)

This builds on the memorable 'I Bought A Jeep' campaign, which ran between 2012 and 2014 and helped to evolve Jeep from a niche choice into a more mainstream SUV, and aims to maintain relevance and keep the Grand Cherokee top of people's consideration set.

Linking visits to the website with test drives is seen as critical, since test drives can be crucial at the influencing stage on the purchase journey, particularly if a driver is switching brands.

"For every 100 people that go to the Jeep website, someone walks into a dealership," explains Jim Ingram, Executive Creative Director of cummins&partners, the agency behind the campaign.

"And for every person who drives a [Jeep] vehicle, 50% are likely to buy it because Jeep is a really good option in Australia."

So far, the results are encouraging, with a 23% increase in web traffic reported within the first week of campaign activity. Dealership traffic is up 45% and Grand Cherokee test drives up 65% week-on-week.

Ingram adds that while Australians are adventurous, sometimes they need an incentive to get beyond the city limits, "so our thinking was to get them a place to go … to take away the variable so they have no choice.

"The idea of owning land cuts it pretty big. They love the idea of going away and an automotive company giving them a chunk of Australian land makes a lot of sense."

Data sourced from Warc

Topics