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Daily Mail will launch US TV show

News, 05 April 2017
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NEW YORK: The Daily Mail, the British tabloid newspaper whose online edition is the largest English language news website in the world, has announced plans to launch a syndicated TV show in the US later this year.

Initially covering 105 markets and reaching two-thirds (66%) of US households, DailyMailTV will start broadcasting in the autumn with a mix of celebrity chat, human interest stories, exclusive stories as well as content from DailyMail.com.

Sinclair Broadcast Group, Tribune Broadcasting, local station broadcasters and CBS Television Distribution have signed up as partners to take DailyMail.com nationwide.

And Dr Phillip McGraw, better known as the TV personality Dr Phil who first found fame on The Oprah Winfrey Show, will be an executive producer and host of the new show.

Commenting on his involvement and what he expects of DailyMailTV, McGraw said: "The show will combine all of the best elements of the website that will both engage and entertain TV audiences."

In addition, DailyMailTV will be produced by Stage 29 Productions, the company run by his son, Jay McGraw, while Carla Pennington, the long-time executive producer of "Dr Phil", is also coming on board as an executive producer.

"With offices in New York City and Los Angeles, DailyMail.com has established itself as a major player in the US media scene since we launched here six years ago and we are excited to take this next step in the development of the brand in partnership with the best producers in the business," said Martin Clarke, Mail Online's publisher.

"We look forward to working with our partners in developing a hit show like nothing currently on the market," he added.

According to the Financial Times, the UK publisher has been working on the project for the past two years and its move into TV is being seen as the latest attempt by its owners, Daily Mail and General Trust, to diversify out of traditional print media as print advertising revenues continue to decline.

Data sourced from Daily Mail, Financial Times; additional content by WARC staff

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