Get a demo Do I subscribe? News sign-up
Print

Bravo's insights into VOD ad frequency

News, 26 April 2017

NEW YORK: Bravo, the cable network, has seen beneficial effects from reaching consumers via video-on-demand (VOD) advertising with a higher degree of frequency than many marketers often assume is optimal.

Dave Kaplan, SVP/Research for Bravo & Oxygen – two networks owned by NBCUniversal – discussed this subject during a session at the Advertising Research Foundation's (ARF) 2017 Annual Conference.

More specifically, he outlined the headline findings from cross-platform analysis conducted by Bravo, and several research partners, based around the launch of reality series "Below Deck Mediterranean".

And Kaplan reported that the data covering viewer behaviour presented some surprising learnings regarding the optimal number of ad exposures logged by the video-on-demand audience.

"We agree that there needs to be some modulation to the amount of frequency," he explained. (For more details, including further strategic insights, read Warc's exclusive report: Bravo takes a deep dive into video-on-demand insights.)

"But I will that say we were definitely, after seeing these results, feeling a bit more liberal about just how many exposures we put in front of consumers."

Elaborating on this topic, Kaplan suggested that Bravo's messaging was especially impactful among people who were exposed to this material at least five times.

"We found that when consumers saw the 'Below Deck Med' advertising on VOD five or more times, it actually generated the highest level of tune-in conversion for that show," said Kaplan.

Caution is still an advisable approach for marketers in the first instance, however. "We can't get crazy here, but it definitely made us feel like perhaps we can raise that floor a little bit more," he added.

Further research will be required, too, as video-on-demand continues to gain traction. "It's come of age a bit. We think it's delivering a desirable and unique audience at scale in a high-impact environment," Kaplan said.

Data sourced from WARC