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Brand brilliance shines through

News, 15 April 2015

NEW YORK: Activision, Divvy, Kind and Always have been named as the winners of the 2015 Brand Brilliance Awards.

The Brand Brilliance Awards, organised by the Brand Activation Association (BAA), itself a division of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), recognize the most influential and dynamic brand marketers across four categories: Brand Activation, Industry Impact, Legacy and Creativity.

Activision took the top spot in the Brand Activation category for its innovative, multi-year support for its Call of Duty video game.

In the past, particular Activision campaigns have been recognised, with, for example, the one that launched 'Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3' winning a Grand Effie in 2013. This sought to engage both existing hardcore gamers and an older audience of lighter gamers who wouldn't typically see Call of Duty as a game for them.

The Game Changer Award went to Divvy/Motivate for its bike sharing business model. Divvy is Chicago's bike sharing program owned by the city's Department of Transportation – with 3,000 bikes and 300 stations – and operated by Motivate, a firm with a track record in such schemes across the US.

KIND Snacks picked up the Hero Brand award for its efforts making the world a better place while simultaneously building the legacy of the brand.

Its KIND Movement has been running for some years now, beginning as a way of encouraging individuals to surprise others with unexpected acts of kindness and progressing to a community of like-minded people invited to carry out specific KINDING missions.

The Inspiration Award was taken by Always, the Procter & Gamble feminine hygiene brand, for its Like a Girl programming.

This shifted the traditional approach to such products – featuring scientific demonstrations or idealised imagery – to address the loss in confidence girls often feel when going through puberty. Core messaging, based around the tagline "Like a Girl", aimed to reframe how people used this expression, making it a term of empowerment.

Data sourced from ANA; additional content by Warc staff