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BelVita scores socially with Hispanics

News, 04 February 2015

NEW YORK: BelVita, the Mondelez snack brand, has the most "stickiness" with Hispanic audiences in social media, according to an analysis of brand engagement on social media.

This was one of the findings revealed by Tania Yuki, founder/ceo of Shareablee, a digital/social analytics consultancy, at the Advertising Research Foundation's Industry Leader Forum in New York.

She explained that Shareablee has developed a tool that measures the cross-platform social performance of over 55,000 brands daily and which "provides brands with a data-driven playbook that reveals the evolving rules, ROI factors and motivations of their social media customers – as well as the engaged fans of competitors".

And when Shareablee dug down into Hispanic-American brand engagement on Facebook, it discovered that BelVita had the greatest staying power, engaging 43% of this audience. (For more, including which brands overindex with Hispanic consumers, read Warc's exclusive report: Mondelez tops US Hispanic-American social-media brand index.)

That was, however, the only Mondelez brand to appear in the Shareablee top ten. A more consistent performance came from Procter & Gamble, the FMCG business, with four of its brands featuring: Oral-B (31%), Clairol (30%), Pepto-Bismol (29%) and Gillette Venus (28%) occupied fourth to seventh places.

Above P&G's brands were Lancôme's L'Oréal (34%) and Johnson & Johnson's Aveeno (33%), in second and third places respectively.

Yuki also disclosed that Hispanic-Americans averaged 1.6 online "actions" – defined as sharing content generated by brand communications – compared with 1.3 for the total US audience engagement with television programming.

Moreover, an audience-loyalty index demonstrated that Hispanic-Americans were 19% more likely to re-engage, month over month, than the average US TV-network social audience.

Yuki noted that if a brand was paying to activate a person for the first or second time, it was important to know they would come back to engage again – "that you're not just having to pay to get them to do something the first time every single time".

Data sourced from Warc