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Ad control extends to mobile

News, 26 February 2015

NEW YORK: US consumers now have the option to opt out of tracking by advertisers or to restrict which ones can contact them on apps and the mobile web with the Digital Advertising Alliance's (DAA) introduction of two new tools.

AppChoices and the DAA Consumer Choice Page for Mobile Web will supplement AdChoices, the self-regulatory organisation's existing scheme for desktops that allows users to control which, if any advertisers, can collect data for use in interest-based advertising.

"The DAA's ubiquitous icon signals a set of safeguards to the consumer," said Lou Mastria, DAA Executive Director, "among them easy-to-use choice mechanisms which give consumers control over data collection and use in the evolving world of the mobile internet and across mobile apps – just as the icon helps deliver access to those same protections on desktops."

While cookies track users on desktops, Mastria explained the in-app technology would rely on Ad-IDs instead. "In the app world it's slightly different but the technology does hold up," he said.

A poll for the DAA last year indicated that seven in ten consumers wanted tools available that provide them transparency and choice over data collection wherever and however they accessed the internet. And nearly as many wanted to pick and choose which companies bring them relevant offers.

"Bringing greater transparency to all digital venues will both build consumer trust and enhance the efficacy of online interest-based advertising," said Randall Rothenberg, IAB president and CEO.

A fine sentiment, but Advertising Age questioned whether people would actually download the app, which the DAA intends to market through its AdChoices button.

This is served on ads 1 trillion times a month globally, but the magazine wondered how many people even noticed those ads – concerns around fraud and viewability are widespread – and if they did see them, how many registered the AdChoices button or even knew what it meant.

Data sourced from PR Newswire, Advertising Age; additional content by Warc staff