VEVEY, Switzerland:, British communications regulator Ofcom is currently Peter Brabeck-Letmathe's number one pin-up - albeit on the Nestlé chairman/ceo's dartboard.

Letmathe, it seems, is less than delighted at the watchdog's upcoming imposition of a ban on child-targeting TV ads for chocolate and other junk foods [WARC News: 23-Feb-07].

The ban will be phased-in as of 1 April 2007, when ads for HFSS foods (high in fats, salt and sugar) will be blocked in and around programmes made for children (including pre-school children), or in or around programmes that are likely to be of particular appeal to children aged 4-9.

And from 1 January 2008, HFSS ads will not be permitted in or around programmes made for children (including pre-school children), or in or around programmes that are likely to be of particular appeal to children aged 4-15.

Splutters Letmathe: "Here we are talking about prohibiting advertising to children when at the same time we are giving them computer games that lead to violence, which is incredible. And then we are surprised we have violence in schools."

Although failing to explain the connection between violent computer games and junk food, Lemathe took a running kick at the UK government's traffic-light food-labelling system which uses green/amber/red labelling on product packs to indicate the amounts of salt, fats and sugar they contain.

Instead, Nestlé has adopted the more detailed Guideline Daily Amounts labelling system, despite criticism by anti-obesity campaigners who argue that it is too complex for most consumers to understand.

Data sourced from Telegraph.co.uk; additional content by WARC staff