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Malcolm White

Like the Zeppelins of old, many of today’s technologies fit a ‘pathological’ profile, argues Malcolm White, and more of us need to take control of the way we use our tech, instead of being used by it.
When it comes to addressing the work-life balance, Malcolm White believes advertising should take a leaf out of William Morris’s book and find ways to make work more satisfying, instead of just encouraging people to work more flexibly.
Malcolm White discovers the truth about a legend of broadcasting history, and finds that the only hysteria caused by the 1938 broadcast of ‘The War of the Worlds’ was the one cooked about by a competing medium - newspapers.
Malcolm White wonders how more communication went from being the force for good that would bring humanity together, to being something altogether more divisive.
Malcolm White wonders if marketing's love affair with crowdsourcing is creating a fake news problem for commercial creativity.
Long ago, I had an interview in New York with a well-known advertising agency. In the last of a round of interviews, the head of human resources used a phrase that I've heard with increasing frequency over the intervening years.
OK, that's not strictly true. Actually, it's not true at all.
If I were to suggest that almost every conversation you have about brands is influenced by the thinking of a Viennese psychologist, you'd probably think I was talking about Sigmund Freud.
I've just come out of a dispiriting advertising research briefing and I wish I could time-travel back to 1974.
Malcolm White looks back ... at Rosser Reeves' legacy, not just his fallacy.