The Shopper's Mind

What communications are needed to create a 'Destination Shopping' experience?

Hollis Ashman
The Understanding & Insight Group
Samuel Rabino
Northeastern University
Dorothy Minkus-McKenna
Berkeley College
Howard R. Moskowitz
Moskowitz Jacobs Inc.

INTRODUCTION - THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE AND THE CATEGORY MANAGER'S SPAN OF CONTROL

There is a growing body of literature on the shopping experience and journals devoted to the scientific aspects of retailing (e.g., Journal of Retailing published by Henry Stewart Ltd., UK). A growing body of anecdotal evidence is coming to the fore, along with the newly emerging science of ethnography as applied to the shopping experience (Underhill, 1999). There are also books about shopping, both from an academic viewpoint (Miller, 1998), and from a more popular viewpoint (Brooke, 2000; Douglas and Isherwood, 1979). All of these sources of information advance our knowledge about what makes a good shopping experience, how customers react in stores, and what may be the key drivers to successful merchandising campaigns, respectively. However, much of the current information only shows how, at the tactical level, one can improve the shopping experience. The information fails to show at a strategic level how the merchandiser can make trade-offs among options across all the shopping situations that the shoppers encounter on a daily basis.