Vicks wins Grand Ogilvy

29 March 2012

NEW YORK: Vicks, the cold and flu remedy, won the Grand Ogilvy at the 2012 ARF David Ogilvy Awards for a campaign leveraging its tie-up with the NFL.

The annual awards recognise the "extraordinary and/or creative use of research in the advertising development process", and are open to research firms, advertising agencies and brand owners.

Overall, 20 Golds and 16 Silvers were distributed in 17 categories, ranging from packaged goods and financial services to successful entries covering shopper marketing programmes.

Vicks DayQuil and NyQuil, liquid capsules offering cold and flu relief, took the Grand Ogilvy for a campaign based around the idea that "In the NFL, there are no sick days."

The brand, made by Procter & Gamble, has regularly exploited its sponsorship deal with the NFL to engage fans by finding the players and supporters who are the most likely to make it to games no matter what.

A total of 11 agencies and research firms worked on this activity, from Publicis and Ipsos to Riber Sports Marketing and the Starcom MediaVest.

Other leading companies picking up prizes were Verizon FiOS for its Enciéndete FiOS effort focused on Hispanic consumers, taking the Research Achievement award, and Chevrolet's fuel-efficient Silverado receiving the Research Innovation awards.

Elsewhere, Coca-Cola, the soft drinks group, IKEA, the furniture retailer, Budweiser, the beer, KFC, the quick service specialist, and Comedy Central, the broadcaster, all claimed Golds.

Members of the judging panel included Donald Gloeckler, manager of next gen research at Procter & Gamble, Rance Crain, the editor-in-chief of Ad Age and Bob Barocci, president/CEO of the ARF.

Also featuring among the 11 judges were Susan Wagner, VP, global strategic insights at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies and Belle Frank, the director of Strategy and Research at Young & Rubicam.

Selected winning case studies from the 2012 ARF David Ogilvy Awards will be available on Warc soon. Subscribers can access top entries from 2011 here.

Data sourced from the ARF; additional content by Warc staff