The Cosmopolitan finds winning formula

19 November 2014

NEW YORK: The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, the luxury hotel and casino, draws on three core marketing principles as it seeks to stand out in one of America's most competitive geographies.

Angela Wise, vp/marketing at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, discussed this topic while speaking at a recent conference.

And she reported that the high-end resort, which launched in 2010, occupies a distinctive position on the Strip, as it is an independent operator up against major players including MGM and Caesar's Entertainment.

The first principle feeding into its marketing strategy thus reads: "We didn't want to follow culture, we wanted to lead it," said Wise. (For more, including the company's aim to create a new media channel, read Warc's exclusive report: The Cosmopolitan Hotel and United Airlines find a new way to engage flyers.)

"This was really an opportunity for us to not emulate what was being done, but to really find our creativity and drive that home."

Many properties in Las Vegas, for example, have specific theme and styles, or else are "really defined and proper in some ways," according to Wise.

"So, for us, it was finding a way to really let our independent spirit shine, and be more highly design-driven and stylistic, and trying to find that kind of spirit."

A related goal covers The Cosmopolitan's second core aim: "to have a unique point of view". Understanding the needs and preferences of its sophisticated audience – which it calls the "curious class" – is part of this process.

"Once you can tap into the consumer's desire for authenticity, we felt like that was a really great place for us," Wise said.

Innovating in the communications field is another priority, as achieving meaningful engagement is a particular challenge in Las Vegas.

"We're going to have a lot of fast-followers; if something works, everyone wants to tack on. So the idea about continually innovating and investing was really important to us," she said.

"Consumers can have anywhere from 5,000 to 20,000 messages that are inputted on them on a daily basis – and certainly, if you're in Las Vegas, you're at the top end of this."

Data sourced from Warc