Retailers lead UK experience charts

27 January 2012

LONDON: John Lewis, Waitrose and Amazon are regarded as the companies providing the best customer experience in the UK, new figures show.

The Temkin Group, the consultancy, asked 3,000 adults to rate how well 66 major firms performed when it came to meeting the needs of shoppers, with retailers that are part of the John Lewis Partnership scoring particularly well.

John Lewis, the department store chain, registered 81%, some 13 points above the retail category average of 68%. It also scored 91% for being accessible and 70% on the emotional measure, leading both these rankings.

Waitrose, the supermarket operator and food division of the Partnership, shared top spot with 81%, versus the norm of 73% for firms from the grocery industry.

Amazon, the ecommerce pioneer, took third place on 79%. It was followed by Farmfoods, Iceland and Morrisons, all of which yielded 77%, with rivals Sainsbury on 75%, and Lidl and Spar on 74%.

Elsewhere, the Co-operative Bank and Nationwide Building Society were the best-regarded banks on 69%, while Tesco Bank was the premier credit card issuer, posting 68% to lead its industry.

Tesco Mobile led the wireless services segment on 64% and Hewlett-Packard was top for computer manufacturers, on 59%. Axa and Aviva were the joint favourite insurers on 51%.

Nevertheless, only 19% of featured organisations achieved a "good" or "excellent" rating, 26% were simply described as "OK", and a further 46% fell into the "poor" or very poor" category.

Members of the credit card sector had a cumulative average of 68%, wireless service providers received 64% and insurance companies scored just 46%.

The brands with the weakest emotional pull included Capital One, the credit card, on 30% and Curry's, the electronics chain, delivered 35%. Churchill, the insurance group, and Dell, the PC maker, hit 36% each.

Sony was perceived to be the least accessible operator, securing 45% here, while Toshiba recorded 47%, behind Compaq and Dell on 48%. All of these firms were assessed regarding their computers.

Churchill also posted the lowest returns for its functional performance on 42%. Sony came next on 48%, and Capital One was on 49%, the analysis added.

Data sourced from The Temkin Group; additional content by Warc staff