Reliance named as India's most valuable brand

23 November 2009

NEW DELHI: Reliance Industries, the energy-to-retail group, is India's most valuable brand, according to a study produced by Brand Finance, the consultancy, for the Economic Times, the daily news title.

The London-based firm's figures suggest that some 19 brands originating from India boast a value of at least $1 billion (€675m; £606m) at present.

Moreover, the top 50 such assets in the Asian nation are now cumulatively worth $67.1bn, a sign of both the growing size and international weight of the rapidly-developing economy.

Reliance Industries posted an uptick of 15% year-on-year, to $7.8bn, and was followed in the rankings by the State Bank of India, up by 30% on an annual basis, to $5.5bn.

The Indian Oil Corporation took third, the same position as last year, on $4.8bn, while Tata Consultancy Services fell two places, to fourth, on $4.1bn.

Its stablemate, Tata Motors, was in fifth, on $3.1bn, ahead of BPCL, the petroleum specialist, on $2.6bn, and Bharti Aitrel, the telecoms giant, on $2.5bn.

Wipro, the IT firm, recorded a total of $2.3bn, down from $3.2bn the previous year, with ITC, on $2.3bn, and ICICI Bank, on $2.2bn, closing out the top ten.

However, ICICI actually dropped three spots, as the financial crisis impacted its overall valuation, while a number of information technology operators, including Wipro and Infosys, also registered declines.

The manufacturing sector housed 20 of the top 50 brands, with automakers like Tata Motors, Bajaj, Honda Hero and Ashok Leyland included in this group.

Overall, nine banking and financial services firms made the top 50, as did five organisations from the energy category, and four apiece in the IT, telecoms and real estate/infrastructure segments.

In total, 19 brands saw their value decrease when compared with 2008, led by Jet Airways, which was down by 56%, Ranbaxy Laboratories, off by 51%, and Dr Reddy's Lab, by 42%.

Brand Finance's study was only based on consumer-facing brands, and excluded holding companies, like Hindustan Unilever, which own a broad portfolio of differently branded goods.

Data sourced from Economic Times; additional content by Warc staff