Health campaign wins Australian Effies

5 September 2014

SYDNEY: A hard-hitting, anti-smoking, campaign by the Australian National Preventive Health Agency won the Grand Effie prize at the Australian Effie Awards 2014 ceremony on Thursday night.

Created by the AJF Partnership in Melbourne, the campaign used suffering to make people quit,  powerfully communicating the pain experienced by people dying of smoking-related diseases and contrasting this with the relative ease of quitting.

It achieved results above target, including campaign awareness, quit attempts, and communicating the link between suffering and smoking, and so achieved the Effie Awards' aim of celebrating and recognising "Ideas that Work".

Warc subscribers can browse all the winners of the Australian Effie Awards, which were jointly presented by The Communications Council and the Australian Association of National Advertisers (AANA) and included a total of 80 finalists, from 32 agencies competing across 18 categories.

There were four Gold Award winners, including BONDS, the Australian underwear brand, Coca-Cola, and two financial services groups – Challenger and RaboDirect.

"How BOOBS made BONDS serious about bras", from Clemenger BBDO in Melbourne, supported the launch of a new range of bras with a temporary brand re-naming.

By appealing to Australians' playful nature, the brand achieved 83% growth in retail stock orders over five months, improved brand awareness, and gained $4m in earned media impressions.

Coca-Cola succeeded in growing market penetration for its Coke Zero brand by 3% with a campaign that appealed to the desire among young consumers to get more out of life.

The "Challenger: Retirement on paper" campaign, created by 303Lowe in Sydney, increased sales of pension annuities well above target after positioning its communication around three key benefits of the product for a more optimistic target audience.

Finally, RaboDirect's "Steal back your dreams" campaign helped to increase website visits and savings deposits. The bank's key message was that its larger rivals had stolen people's dreams by luring them with initial good interest rates which later delivered poor returns.

Warc subscribers can browse all the winners of the 2014 Australian Effie Awards.

Data sourced from Effie Australia; additional content by Warc staff