Global Newspaper Sales Rose 10% Over Past Five Years

04 June 2008

GÖTEBORG, Sweden: Over 1,800 media executives at the 61st World Newspaper Congress are this week celebrating the ongoing growth of the global newspaper industry, which over the past five years has enjoyed an averaged increase in paid circulation sales of nearly ten per cent. In 2007 global sales rose 2.57%.

Joy, however, was not entirely unconfined. Notably  in the UK, where averaged newspaper circulations fell 10.14% between 2002-2007 – and were down 3.46% in the latter year.

Boosting the global average were India and China, where growth respectively soared 35.51% and 20.69% over the five year period. In 2007 the respective rises were 11.22% and 3.84%.  

The data covers 233 counties in membership of the World Association of Newspapers.

Ceo Timothy Balding told delegates: "In places where paid-for circulation is declining, notably the United States and some countries in western Europe, newspapers continue to extend their reach through a wide variety of free and niche publications and their rapidly developing multimedia platforms."

Paid-for daily newspapers worldwide saw ad revenues rise 12.84% over the five years; and by just 0.86% last year. During the same periods, adspend within the European Union rose 9.91% and 1.51% respectively.

But only nineteen of the EU's twenty-four member states were able to raise their glasses to increases in newspaper ad revenues.

In the UK adspend declined 1.79% in 2007, while over the past five years it was one of only three nations (alongside Poland and Portugal) to witness an averaged fall of 5.18% in ad revenues.

Data sourced from; additional content by WARC staff