A third of shoppers use mobile in-store

18 September 2014

BOSTON: More than one-third (34%) of American shoppers carry out retail-related activities on their mobile device when they're in a store, according to a new report.

Of those that use their mobile device in-store, almost a quarter (23%) go on to use a social network while, more importantly, over half (54%) use their social networks for product or brand discovery as well as feedback rather than just for socialising.

Specifically, shoppers use a social network in-store for discovery (39%), socialising (29%), entertainment (17%) and peer feedback (15%).

These are the key findings in the Getting Mobile Right report from Millward Brown Digital, the digital solutions provider, which claims that its study highlights the "key mobile business questions that should be top of mind for marketers".

"Consumers have a different type of relationship with their mobile devices – it's an inherently more personal experience," explained Stephen DiMarco, president of Millward Brown Digital.

"Therefore, mobile changes the dynamics of relationships that consumers have with brands," he said.

Mobile shoppers are also active users of apps, the report said. Almost half (46%) use both apps and browsers with almost three-quarters (72%) relying on no more than five apps installed on their devices.

The report went on to state that the average mobile advertising campaign is two to four times more effective than PC-based online campaigns with regard to brand awareness, brand favourability and purchase intent.

In order to make the most of this, Millward Brown advised advertisers that the most effective mobile display ads feature consistent branding, use a simple colour palette, and concentrate on a focused message with a perceived value to the consumer.

Mobile ads should "intrigue consumers by starting a story but not telling the whole story", the report said, and they work best when they combine video with an interactive layer while using clear messages to secure an emotional response.

Data sourced from Millward Brown Digital; additional content by Warc staff